$500.00 grant from the Joe Otte Memorial Fund

The first $500.00 grant from the Joe Otte Memorial Fund has been awarded to Personal and Family Counseling Services to be used for treatment and support through the New Philadelphia Municipal Recovery Court, according to Mary Ann Otte, the Founder and Chair of the Memorial Fund and Grant Committee. "This is exciting for our Committee Members and we felt it would be appropriate to make the initial donation to Personal and Family Counseling Services on behalf of the New Philadelphia Municipal Recovery Court. Judge VonAllman has been an extraordinary supporter of treatment for individuals with addictions and we're very pleased to be able to assist the program", says Otte. In acknowledging appreciation for the grant, Judge Nanette DeGarmo VonAllman noted, “Alcohol and drug addiction only have two possible outcomes: remission or death. This grant from the Joe Otte Memorial Fund proves that hope exists, even after the tragic and preventable death of a wonderful young man. The sons, daughters, sisters, brothers, mothers and fathers in the Recovery Court program, who are fighting the disease of addiction every day in their own lives, are truly grateful for this generous gift.”

The Memorial Fund was established by Mary Ann Otte in 2013 following the death of her son, Joe, by an accidental heroin overdose. He was 31 years old. The purpose of the fund is to provide financial support for educational events and activities designed to raise awareness about the causes and risks associated with addiction.

According to Pam Trimmer, Executive Director of Personal and Family Counseling Services, their agency has partnered with the specialty docket recovery court to provide treatment and supportive services to the defendants in the Recovery Court Program. “The funds will be used to purchase incentive items for individuals in the program to encourage continued compliance in their recovery process and to reward those taking active steps to maintain sobriety. It has been a pleasure to work with the court and the defendants to move this community and its residents away from addiction and into recovery. It is imperative that we all work together to achieve lasting change and develop healthy families. We would like to thank the Joe Otte Memorial Fund for its contribution towards these efforts”, states Trimmer.

In October, the 1st Annual Joe Otte Memorial Fund dinner was held at Woods Tall Timber Lake Lodge to promote awareness of this fund. The 150 people in attendance enjoyed a gourmet dinner and listened to Amy O'Grady from the Ohio Attorney General's Office speak about the heroin epidemic. The money raised through generous donations will fund the grant program. Donations are still being accepted and can be made directly to the ADAMHS Board in care of the Joe Otte Memorial Fund, 119 Garland Dr. SW, New Philadelphia, OH, 44663 or on-line by visiting the ADAMHS Board’s website at http://adamhtc.org/joe-otte-memorial-fund/.

The ADAMHS Board is the fiscal agent for the Memorial Fund and works in conjunction with committee members to process funding requests and disburse grants to community agencies for drug prevention and substance abuse intervention efforts. "It has been an honor to be involved in this project from the beginning and watch it evolve into something tangible where community groups and individuals can benefit" according to Dave Schaffer, Executive Director of the ADAMHS Board.

There are no deadlines associated with submitting a funding request and applications are available and may be downloaded by visiting the ADAMHS Board’s website at http://adamhtc.org/joe-otte-memorial-fund/. Otte anticipates making awards available annually to schools and community agencies or programs. Please direct questions about the Memorial Fund to Mary Ann Otte at 330.204.5464

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“We Are the Majority Rally”

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Five schools attended the “We Are the Majority Rally” in Columbus at the Statehouse—Tusky Valley High School, New Phila High School, Dover High School, Carrollton High School and Tuscarawas Central Catholic on Thursday, April 28th. A total of 80 students from our area and over 1,800 students from throughout Ohio heard speakers who discussed the importance of living a positive, healthy lifestyle and then marched to the statehouse for other activities.

 

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CDC Issues Report on Ohio Visit Examining Increase in Fentanyl-Related Drug Overdose Deaths

CDC ICON 3.2016COLUMBUS – The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a report examining the increase in unintentional fentanyl-related drug overdose deaths in Ohio. READ THE REPORT

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2016 New Board Members

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The ADAMHS Board of Tuscarawas and Carroll Counties announces the appointment of six new Board Members.

From left to right, they are Jeff Neidig, Tuscarawas County; Chris Sand-Ashley, Tuscarawas County; Mary Ann Otte, Tuscarawas County; Julie Smith, Tuscarawas County; Calvin Graham, Carroll County; Christi Lamb, Tuscarawas County

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CVS Pharmacies Announce Availability of Naloxone throughout Ohio

This week, CVS Health announced would make the opioid overdose reversal medicine naloxone available without a prescription at all CVS Pharmacy locations across Ohio beginning in late March 2016.  White House National Drug Control Policy Director Michael Botticelli, Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine and Lucas County Sheriff John Tharp joined CVS Health in making the announcement at a press conference in Toledo on Monday. “Naloxone is a safe and effective antidote to opioid overdoses and by expanding access to this medication in our Ohio pharmacies by the use of a physician’s standing order for patients without a prescription, we can help save lives,” said Tom Davis, RPh, Vice President of Pharmacy Professional Practices at CVS Pharmacy. “We support expanding naloxone availability and we applaud the State of Ohio for its leadership in the fight against drug abuse and addiction.”

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Issue 28 Passes With Overwhelming Support!

Organizers and supporters of Issue 28, the 0.5 mill ADAMHS Board renewal levy on the Nov. 3 ballot, are offering their appreciation of the overwhelming support of the community as they continue the work of addressing mental illness and addiction in Tuscarawas County.

By a nearly 2-1 margin, the voting results continued a trend of community support that began in 1982.  That year, Tuscarawas County voters approved a new levy for the provision of mental health and addiction treatment, and it has been renewed or replaced continuously since then.  Generating $889,000 per year, the funding will help continue a local safety net of resources, providing for children's mental health services, crisis intervention and care, and housing assistance.

For any questions regarding the ADAMHS Board levy or the services it funds, please contact the ADAMHS Board at 330-364-6488.

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Walk Out of Darkness Event a Success

On September 27th, over 250 people attended the Walk Out of Darkness suicide awareness event at Lee Stadium in Newcomerstown.  The first annual event, attended by individuals whose lives have been touched by suicide, was one of many held nation wide to promote awareness about suicide and depression and raise money for suicide prevention, research and education.  The event was highlighted by speeches from suicide survivors Jayde Bricker and former Detroit Lions quarterback Eric Hipple.

More than $10,000 was raised for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and will be distributed locally for outreach and education.

For more information about suicide prevention and support, please contact Kristie Wilkin, local Survivor of Suicide Support Group facilitator at 740-294-8496.

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Implementation of the Sequential Intercept Model Underway

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Schaffer

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Fortune

Local officials representing various Courts, not-for-profits, police departments and concerned citizens are in the process of developing recommendations that will improve interventions and divert individuals with mental health disorders from being disproportionately involved in the criminal justice system. The participants are using a process called the “Sequential Intercept Model or SIM” developed by the National GAINS Center in order to determine where and when opportunities exist for mentally ill offenders to be referred for assessments and interventions.  Research demonstrates that individuals with severe and persistent mental illnesses spend two and three times longer incarcerated than the general population of inmates.

“There are many signals to a potential case involving someone with a mental health disorder during the course of a call to 911, through engagement by law enforcement, incarceration and reentry to the community”, according to Dave Schaffer, Executive Director of the ADAMHS Board.  He says “We walked through a very structured process with the assistance of SIM trainers over a day and a half in order to look at five specific areas where we might improve screening and referral processes”.

Seana Todd-Fortune, the Reentry Coordinator at the Tuscarawas County Jail was charged with organizing the SIM process that included creation of a planning team and coordination of the various subcommittees that are each examining a point along the intervention process.  According to Todd-Fortune “we’re examining closely the type of information available to us and trying to determine how best to use it.  Beginning with 911 Dispatchers, police reports, jail and court data and reentry to the community”.   According to Seana, five distinct subcommittees were created and are currently preparing recommendations on enhancing outreach on behalf of this population.

The committee reports will be presented to the larger group of members sometime in October where an implementation strategy, timeframes and outcomes will be discussed.

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ADAMHS Board Says Goodbye to 3 Long Time Members

kresshannonschafferboydAt its June 15, 2015 meeting, the ADAMHS Board recognized three long standing members that completed their terms of office on their Board of Directors.  Brian Kress, Pat Russell and Bob Hannon participated in their final meeting of the Board and received plaques commemorating their volunteer work within the community and service on the Board.

Brian Kress, of Dover, has been an active member of the Board for the past six years.  Appointed to our Board by the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, Brian has chaired and served on various committees during his two full terms and plans to continue his passion for service to local behavioral health services by remaining as a volunteer for the CARY Project, a project designed to help community youth and teens experimenting with drugs or alcohol.  Brian is employed by Edgetech/Lauren International as a Project Manager.

Pat Russell, of New Philadelphia, is a veteran to the ADAMHS Board as she was appointed to serve by the Tuscarawas County Commissioners from 1987 through 1995 and was again appointed by the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services from 2008 through 2015; devoting 15 years of service to community members of Tuscarawas and Carroll Counties.  An active member of the Board, Pat served on and chaired several committees during her years of service.  Pat is a well-known realtor in the community employed by Re/Max Crossroads Property.

Bob Hannon, of Sugarcreek, was appointed to serve as a member of the ADAMHS Board by the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services.  Bob served on the Board for five years and contributed service to various committees as well.  Bob is employed by Dover City Schools as a Guidance Counselor where he will continue to advocate for our community and youth.

On behalf of the Board and staff, we want to extend a heartfelt thank you to Brian, Bob add Pat for their countless hours of volunteer work in support of individuals and families experiencing mental health, addiction and other behavioral health disorders.

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ADAMHS Board Holds Another Successful Benefit Golf Outing

On Wednesday, May 20, 2015, the Friends of ADAMH held their 7th Annual Benefit Golf Outing at Union Country Club in Dover.  Thirteen teams participated in the 4-person scramble which started with a lunch at 11:30, shot-gun start at 1:00 and concluded with dinner and an awards ceremony.

Proceeds from the annual outing are used to continue efforts by Friends of ADAMH and The ADAMHS Board to reduce the stigma surrounding mental illness and substance abuse and improve access to services.

At the awards ceremony following the event, the ADAMHS Board was pleased to recognize Truck Sales and Service of Midvale for their longtime commitment to the outing and the ADAMHS Board.  TS&S has provided a Patron-Level sponsor each year of the event, and this year increased their support to a Founding-Level sponsorship.

The Board also recognized additional seven-year sponsors Community Mental Healthcare (2 Teams each year); Southeast Inc.; Brad Hillyer at Connolly, Hillyer, and Ong; Stepping Stone Group Home; Ember Complete Care;   Kline, Keppel, and Koryak; Kennedy Insurance Agency; Gay Cox and Family; John Lyons / Foundation for Appalachian Ohio; Rea and Associates;

Six-year sponsors included Steve and Becky Mastin and Your Local Wendy’s; ComDoc; and Don Jimison;

Other sponsors were Advocacy, Choices and Empowerment, Inc. (2 years); Carrollton Rotary (5 years); East Central Ohio Educational Service Center (2 years); Grant Street Creative / The Tradeshow Stores (4 years); Judge Gary L. Willen (4 years); Pat Russell / ReMax Crossroads (3 years); Putman Properties (3 years); Quanex I.G. Systems (3 years); Sugarcreek Heating and Cooling; and Union Hospital (4 years).

For more information about upcoming ADAMHS Board events or to find out about the latest in local mental health and addiction services and programs, please visit http://adamhtc.org.

From Left: Former ADAMHS Board Member Orvis Campbell, Truck Sales and Service Owner Rod Rafael, ADAMHS Board Chair Diana Boyd, ADAMHS Board Executive Director David Schaffer, and ADAMHS Board Member John Lyons.

TSS and Board

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CARY Project (Connecting with At-Risk Youth)

CaryThe CARY Project

The ADAMHS Board, with community members, began the CARY Project in the hope of impacting teens experimenting with drugs or alcohol. The CARY Supports, who are community members that have a loved one that has struggled with addiction, will meet with the youth one-on-one to share their realities of drug and alcohol use. Each of the CARY Supports has a child that began drug and alcohol use in the teen years. The use eventually developed into addiction. Some of their children have passed away due to drugs or alcohol. Others are in recovery. Regardless of the result, the CARY Supports want to make sure your child has the opportunity to understand how quickly and quietly addiction develops and the struggles related to overcoming drug or alcohol addiction.

The CARY Project is:

  • A confidential one-on-one meeting with the teen and the CARY Support in a neutral location
  • The teen will identify 10 questions he or she has of the CARY Support and provide them to the CARY Project Manager, Natalie Bollon, at least 3 days prior to the meeting.
  • The meeting between the teen and the CARY Support will last a maximum of 90 minutes
  • The teen will complete a written summary of the meeting and provide this to the Project Manager
    *Even though the CARY Project is a one-time meeting, identifying the questions before the meeting and writing a summary after will ensure the teen is spending time preparing for and revisiting the topic of drugs and alcohol.

The CARY Project is not:

  • A clinical intervention. The CARY Supports are not counselors or social workers. They will share their loved one’s story in the hope that your child will understand the realities of drug and alcohol use and how quickly addiction can develop.

Who are the CARY Supports:

Quote from Mary Otte

OTTESWhen I was asked by the ADAMHS Board if I'd like to be involved with The Cary Project, I readily agreed. I lost my son, Joey, to a heroin overdose and as a mom and on behalf of Joey, my desire is to bring attention to the devastating consequences of drug and alcohol abuse. I want kids to know that there are choices to be made in life that impact their future and to choose wisely who their friends are. I want youth to know we, as Cary support members, care about them and from our own personal experiences we are willing to listen and talk with them. I want those youth, who may be heading down the wrong path, to know that they are loved and are not alone.

Quote from Anita Davis

Anita Rotary PictureNovember 12, 2005 my oldest son, Zachary died of a heroin overdose. This was after many years of counseling, rehabs, doctors, behavior modification camps. My family and I did all that we could to save Zachary, but it was not enough. Since then I have made it my mission to educate teens about the dangers and consequences of drugs. Zachary wanted me to tell others that they have a choice and can have a better life. I have spoken to at least 12,000 kids at schools, churches, libraries and teen centers. I have heard from kids and parents that it is making an impact. Www.zachsstory.org

Quotes from the schools:

This is a quote from Derrick Rausch, the Principal of the James R. Wright STAR Alternative school

We got involved with the program due to the difficult task in combating drug usage within the youth population and the importance of the task. Working with this population for the past eight years, I have seen countless personal attempts and programs try to steer children away from peer pressure and drug usage. While most of the programs seem to be very informative, most lack the personal or real life aspect of such a serious topic. Your program not only focuses on those two areas, but creates a point of contact for the child and the parent. The child gets the opportunity to become connected to the pain and heartache that drug addiction has on individuals as well as those around them. This connection seems to be a pivotal aspect that many students do not get listening to a lecture or watching a television series such as Intervention. (That it'll never happen to me syndrome kicks in) I see the program as a wonderful resource for many of the parents that I encounter that have no idea on how to handle their child's problem and are searching for guidance before it's too late. 

Quote from Robert Hamm, Dover High School Superintendent

“We want to do anything we can to prevent the development of addiction in our students. The unique component of this project is the one-on-one interaction between students and community members who have witnessed the development of addiction in their own children. We’ve received positive feedback from school personnel and parents that have participated in the program. Most importantly, students that have participated have noted that this program has helped to make a difference in their lives.”

The CARY Project has been featured:

The downloadable referral form can be access here and sent to: Natalie@adamhtc.org

CARY Project Manager – Natalie Bollon, PCC-S
Manager of Community Services,
ADAMHS Board of Tuscarawas and Carroll Counties
330-364-6488 or 330-627-7912

 

 

 

 

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Overdose Rescue Kits Help Save Lives

nx-nasalAn increase in heroin and prescription opiate abuse coupled with accidental drug overdoses have resulted in the ADAMHS Board adding another tool in the fight against addiction.

Overdose rescue kits, sometimes referred to as Narcan Kits or Naloxone Kits, were recently purchased by the ADAMHS Board and distributed to local law enforcement agencies for use by patrol officers responding to the scene of an overdose and for inmates released from jail.  Carroll County Sheriff deputies as well as Carrollton Police Department officers were provided rescue kits, which deliver an intranasal dose of Naloxone as a treatment for a person with a known or suspected opioid overdose.  Tuscarawas County jail medical personnel distribute the kits to inmates for use upon release.  In both cases the law requires that emergency medical technicians are contacted immediately following administration of the anti-overdose drug.

Naloxone, also marketed as Narcan, is a pure opioid antagonist and is designed to reverse the effect of an overdose that might have otherwise resulted in death to the individual.  Naloxone usually reverses the depression of the central nervous and respiratory systems, which is the most common cause of death following an overdose.

Purchase and distribution of Naloxone rescue kits became an option in Ohio after Gov. John Kasich signed HB170 into law in March of 2014.  HB170 expanded the list of licensed health professionals, emergency responders and peace officers who are authorized to administer Naloxone. The bill also allows certain health professionals to distribute the kits to any person, family member, or friend of a person who is at risk of experiencing an opioid related overdose.

For more information about Naloxone or rescue kits, please call the ADAMHS Board at 330-364-6488.

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ADAMHS Board Welcomes New Members

Ms. Polly Patin-Mellor, Dover and Michael “Mickey” Zimmerman, New Philadelphia, were appointed to the Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services Board (ADAMHS) of Tuscarawas and Carroll Counties.  Each were administered their oaths of office during the Board’s April Governing Board meeting.

Polly PM bio photo cropped

Patin-Mellor

Patin-Mellor previously served on the Board and was reappointed by the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services and fulfills a Board member slot as a client of the mental health system.  She was first diagnosed with a mental health disorder in 1971 (postpartum depression) following the birth of her son.  Her illness evolved into a sometimes debilitating battle with bipolar disorder leading to numerous interruptions in her life.  Her first treatments included “electric shock” therapies in Canton, Ohio, followed by numerous interventions, including six hospitalizations for up to two months each during these episodes of care.  Patin-Mellor began writing poems as a part of a recovery program while she was a patient at Harding Hospital and completed a book of poetry titled “Dear God Poems” to assist others in their recovery from mental illnesses.  Her advice to individuals experiencing severe and persistent mental illness is “…whether you’re going through a difficult time or you’re feeling good about yourself, write down your feelings and thoughts in a journal.  Then periodically review them when things are tough in order to know that you can and will feel better.”

She obtained an Associate’s Degree in Liberal Arts from Kent State University in order to pursue a career in rehabilitation therapy.  Locally, she has worked as an activities therapist at West Lafayette Nursing Care Center as well as Community Mental Healthcare, Inc. in Dover.  She is the founder of the Tuscarawas County Chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness which is still in existence.

She volunteers her time and talents on behalf of a number of individuals and organizations including:  Story-telling for patients of Hennis Home Care; producing “cancer pillows” for patients of both Union and Aultman Hospitals; and reaching out to persons with mental illnesses.  In recognition of her contributions to the mental health field, Ms. Patin-Mellor received the Robert E. Torgler award from Community Mental Healthcare in 2004.  She is also a member of New Pointe Community Church in Sugarcreek.  Polly is currently training a group of individuals to create greeting cards for sale as a permanent fundraiser for Advocacy, Choices and Empowerment.  Please contact Todd Little for products and pricing at 330.308.8604.

Zimmerman

 

Zimmerman of New Philadelphia was appointed by the Tuscarawas County Board of Commissioners.  He is a graduate of New Philadelphia High School, earned an undergraduate degree from Bowling Green State University and a Juris Doctor from Case Western Reserve University in 2014.  In addition to serving on the ADAMHS Board, Zimmerman is also a member of the Board of Directors of the Tuscarawas County Humane Society.  According to Zimmerman “alcohol addiction, drug addiction and mental health matters are extremely important to me and I welcome the opportunity to help others.  Being on the ADAMHS Board places me in a position to help our community at-large”.

As a division of county government established in Ohio Revised Code 340, the ADAMHS Board is governed by a fourteen member volunteer Board and charged with ensuring that a full continuum of mental health and recovery services are available to residents of the service district.  The Board carries out its mission primarily by contracting with local behavioral health intervention and prevention provider agencies which serve individuals and families with psychiatric and addictive disorders.

A statewide network of 53 ADAMHS Boards actively engages in community planning, system financing, legislative advocacy and service coordination in support of community-based interventions and treatment on behalf of Ohio’s 88 Counties.

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Board of Directors Meeting

meeting1At the November 19, 2014 ADAMHS Board of Directors meeting at Atwood Lodge, the Carrollton High School Youth Led Prevention group previewed their interactive performance “The pHarming Effects”.  This presentation addresses the misuse and abuse of prescription drugs and how it is affecting youth today, and ultimately the communities they live in.  Other information presented includes the definition of prescription drug abuse and misuse, the impact of prescription drug marketing, and other relevant statistics and strategies to initiate change.

If you are interested in bringing this training to your school, business, or community organization, please contact Kim Rykse, Youth Led Prevention Specialist or Trenna Parsons, Coordinator for a Drug Free Carroll County at Personal and Family Counseling Services at 330-343-8171.

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Wing Walkers

wingwalkersThe Tuscarawas/Carroll Co. Survivor of Suicide Support Group/Wing Walkers plus family and friends walked in North Canton's First Out of Darkness Walk on October 5th.  Out of Darkness Walks are held nationwide, and raise money for vital research and educational programs to prevent suicide and save lives.  Through these walks, awareness is raised about depression and suicide, and they also provide comfort and assistance to those who have lost someone to suicide.  North Canton's goal for their first year was to have 100 walkers and raise $10,000.00.  400 walkers attended, and over $27,000.00 was raised for suicide prevention, so their expectations were exceeded substantially.  The Tuscarawas/Carroll Co. group is planning their own walk in Tuscarawas County for 2015. The latest statistics are:  113 people die each day due to suicide in the U.S.

Pictured are:
Front Row:  Courtney Wallick, Karen Wallick, Melissa Betts, Kristie Wilkin - Co-Facilitator, Lindsey Bryan, Jayde Bricker, Vickie Bricker
Back Row:  Cindy Laizure, Beshell Laizure, David Keener, Tom Studer, and Todd Little - Co-facilitator

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Local Homeless Count to be Held This Month

2015 PIT Count PosterVolunteers from several social service agencies in Tuscarawas County will participate in the National Street and Shelter Homeless Point-in-Time Count, to be held locally on January 27th, 2015. This coordinated effort is used to establish the number of individuals currently living in emergency shelters or places not otherwise meant for human habitation in a designated geographic area.

“By establishing a baseline count of individuals who are under-housed at a specific point-in-time, we are able to show the level of need for our local community”, says Michael Dotts, Special Projects Manager at the ADAMHS Board and the local PIT Count Coordinator.  “Using this count as a basis, we as a community are telling funders of homeless reduction and prevention programs that Tuscarawas County has a need for additional funding to continue the work of ending homelessness in the county”

In order to complete the count, staff from local agencies, including the two local emergency shelters, Friends of the Homeless and Harbor House Domestic Violence Shelter, will ask each resident to complete a short questionnaire regarding their family and their current episode of homelessness.  This data will be used to target the causes of homelessness in the area, with the intent to develop programs to address these causes.  Volunteers will also canvass the community in an attempt to locate unsheltered homeless individuals to determine the same information.

For more information on the P.I.T. count, please call Michael Dotts at 330-364-6488.

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Opiate Task Force

judgeIn June of 2014 the Ohio Supreme Court challenged local court jurisdictions, elected officials and various social service organizations to work more closely on strategies to stem the rash of heroin abuse and overdose deaths occurring in communities across Ohio.  Since the conclusion of the Supreme Court’s Statewide Judicial Symposium on Opiate Addiction, Judge Nanette VonAllman of the New Philadelphia Municipal Court has been convening a local “Opiate Task Force” in order for various organizations with a vested interest in addressing opiate abuse to be able to share ideas on interventions and policy issues that will assist our community to reduce the impact of heroin abuse on individuals and families.

The Task Force is playing an important role in not only raising awareness about opiate-abuse related problems but also in identifying ways in which our addiction treatment agencies, courts, human service and law enforcement organizations can better collaborate on programs and services.  A key to improving cooperation includes analyzing data on heroin abuse and overdoses from emergency departments, health departments and the other organizations actively involved with the Task Force.  Year-to-date, the Task Force has been instrumental in advancing stakeholder knowledge of medication assisted treatment interventions and also played a role in identifying the need for a Reentry Coordinator at the Tuscarawas County Jail.

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2016 Statewide Suicide Prevention Conference – May 13

Time is running out to register to attend the 2016 Statewide Suicide Prevention Conference on May 13 on the campus of The Ohio State University. The third annual symposium focuses on Suicide and the Family and will feature presentations from leading researchers and advocates. New this year, the conference will feature two breakout sessions that will provide tools and resources in addressing the impact of suicide and suicide prevention. The conference is presented by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in partnership with OhioMHAS. For more information, click the link above or contact Caitlin Willett at 614.293.7827 | Caitlin.Willet@osumc.edu.

View the agenda
Fee information
Presenter bios
Register online
OSU Neurological Institute Mental Health Fair – May 4

ADAMHTC. opiod art 4.4.2016Zero Suicide Webinars

March 16 The Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (OhioMHAS) is hosting a webinar to provide an overview of the upcoming regional Ohio Zero Suicide Academies. The webinars will provide brief overviews of OhioMHAS suicide prevention efforts and will focus mainly on the six regional two-day Ohio Zero Suicide Academies and Learning Communities targeting clinical care providers in behavioral health and primary care settings as well as Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC). The webinar will be offered on March 16 from 10-11 a.m. and again from 1-2 p.m. Please click on the links below to register. Recordings of the webinars will be made available online for those who are unable to attend. March 16 | 10-11 a.m. March 16 | 1-2 p.m.

oarx 2.2016 repor header

CVS Pharmacies Announce Availability of Naloxone throughout Ohio

This week, CVS Health announced would make the opioid overdose reversal medicine naloxone available without a prescription at all CVS Pharmacy locations across Ohio beginning in late March 2016.  White House National Drug Control Policy Director Michael Botticelli, Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine and Lucas County Sheriff John Tharp joined CVS Health in making the announcement at a press conference in Toledo on Monday. “Naloxone is a safe and effective antidote to opioid overdoses and by expanding access to this medication in our Ohio pharmacies by the use of a physician’s standing order for patients without a prescription, we can help save lives,” said Tom Davis, RPh, Vice President of Pharmacy Professional Practices at CVS Pharmacy. “We support expanding naloxone availability and we applaud the State of Ohio for its leadership in the fight against drug abuse and addiction.”

onlinesmallHave you ever wondered whether your drinking habits are dangerous to you or those around you? Do you know what behaviors are indicators of an eating disorder? Could you recognize signs of bipolar disorder in yourself or a friend?

Recognizing the signs of an ongoing or developing mental health issue is key to treatment and recovery.  The Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services of Tuscarawas and Carroll Counties now provides instant anonymous online screenings for many significant mental health conditions, including adolescent depression, alcohol abuse, Bipolar Disorder, depression in adults, eating disorders, General Anxiety Disorder and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Our screening tools are easy-to-use and completely anonymous. By answering a series of simple questions, a visitor can determine right away whether his or her behavior and current mental status reflect the signs of a serious mental illness or substance abuse problem. Anyone can use these screening tools without obligation and in complete confidence.

In the past year, 21.7% of Ohioans age 18 and older with a mental illness reported a perceived need for treatment, but did not receive any treatment or counseling. Ohio ranks 32nd in the nation when it comes to unmet need for mental health services. (Source: NSDUH/HPIO)

In the past year, 2.6% of Ohioans ages 12 and older needed but did not receive treatment for illicit drug use. Ohio ranks 43rd in the nation when it comes to access to treatment for illicit drug use. (Source: NSDUH/HPIO)

The good news is that local, effective and affordable treatment is readily available for residents of Tuscarawas and Carroll Counties. In addition to our screening tools, visitors can also learn more about serious mental illness and addiction, and treatment options available to them.

Overdose Rescue Kits Help Save Lives

An increase in heroin and prescription opiate abuse coupled with accidental drug overdoses have resulted in the ADAMHS Board adding another tool in the fight against addiction. Overdose rescue kits, sometimes referred to as Narcan Kits or Naloxone Kits, were recently purchased by the ADAMHS Board and distributed to local law enforcement agencies for use […]

Continue Reading

ADAMHS Board Welcomes New Members

Ms. Polly Patin-Mellor, Dover and Michael “Mickey” Zimmerman, New Philadelphia, were appointed to the Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services Board (ADAMHS) of Tuscarawas and Carroll Counties.  Each were administered their oaths of office during the Board’s April Governing Board meeting. Patin-Mellor previously served on the Board and was reappointed by the Department of […]

Continue Reading

Board of Directors Meeting

At the November 19, 2014 ADAMHS Board of Directors meeting at Atwood Lodge, the Carrollton High School Youth Led Prevention group previewed their interactive performance “The pHarming Effects”.  This presentation addresses the misuse and abuse of prescription drugs and how it is affecting youth today, and ultimately the communities they live in.  Other information presented […]

Continue Reading

Wing Walkers

The Tuscarawas/Carroll Co. Survivor of Suicide Support Group/Wing Walkers plus family and friends walked in North Canton’s First Out of Darkness Walk on October 5th.  Out of Darkness Walks are held nationwide, and raise money for vital research and educational programs to prevent suicide and save lives.  Through these walks, awareness is raised about depression […]

Continue Reading

Local Homeless Count to be Held This Month

Volunteers from several social service agencies in Tuscarawas County will participate in the National Street and Shelter Homeless Point-in-Time Count, to be held locally on January 27th, 2015. This coordinated effort is used to establish the number of individuals currently living in emergency shelters or places not otherwise meant for human habitation in a designated […]

Continue Reading

Opiate Task Force

In June of 2014 the Ohio Supreme Court challenged local court jurisdictions, elected officials and various social service organizations to work more closely on strategies to stem the rash of heroin abuse and overdose deaths occurring in communities across Ohio.  Since the conclusion of the Supreme Court’s Statewide Judicial Symposium on Opiate Addiction, Judge Nanette […]

Continue Reading